SLAM! Sports SLAM! Wrestling
  May 29, 2000



News & Rumours
Bios
Obits
Canadian Hall of Fame
WrestleMania 30
WrestleMania 30 photos
Video
Movie Database
Minority Mat Report
Columnists
Features
Results Archive
PPV Reviews
SLAM! Wrestling store
On Facebook
On Twitter
Send Feedback




Photo Galleries

SHIMMER taping


The Ultimate Warrior


Raw in New Orleans


WrestleMania XXX Main Events


WrestleMania XXX Opening Half


WWE Hall of Fame Ceremony
WWE Hall of Fame Red Carpet


Make-A-Wish party







SCOREBOARD
PHOTO GALLERY
VIDEO GALLERY
COMMENT




READER ALERT: For all the latest wrestling happenings, check out our News & Rumours section.

Edmonton fans line up to see WWF stars


By MIKE ROSS -- Edmonton Sun
Edmonton's most loyal fans of professional wrestling turned up hours before WWF's Attitude show even started in Skyreach Centre yesterday.

In the pouring rain, noses pressed through the chain-link fence, nearly 200 kids were waiting by the pass gate since 1 p.m. to catch a glimpse of their favourite WWF stars - but especially The Rock and returning hometown hero Chris Benoit, dubbed The Crippler.

"To wait for The Rock is worth it, even getting to see him up close," said 13-year-old John Mikhail. "He has the best insults: 'It doesn't matter what your name is!' "

Ryan Pekar, 14, favoured the dreaded Triple-H, who's considered a villain in the pantheon of wrestling stars.

"He's the best at what he does," Pekar said. "Everybody hates him. That means he's good."

Attracting nearly 15,000 fans to Skyreach Centre, last night's burly ballet included The Hardy Boyz, Kane, The Undertaker and many other hulking athletes with names like rappers, often with their bodacious female valets in tow.

Decked out like a pimp, The Godfather arrived with a bevy of beauties he referred to as "the ho train."

But it was clear The Rock was the man they all came to see.

"He's hot," said Shannon Lewis, 17. "He doesn't care what anybody thinks, and that's what makes him attractive. He's got a good body, too, so that's good."

After a long period of obscurity, professional wrestling has bounced back to become one of the biggest entertainment phenomenons of the modern age. WWF's enterprises include tours, pay-per-view specials and intensive merchandising, making millions of dollars and superstars out of large men.