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  13 April, 1999



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READER ALERT: For all the latest wrestling happenings, check out our News & Rumours section.

Godfather new I-C champ


The Godfather celebrates his Intercontinental title win.
Click here for a video clip of his win (2.1 MB).
  After years of coasting along as a mid-carder, the WWF has apparently figured out what to do with Charles Wright, aka The Godfather.

  Make him the Intercontinental champion.

  Godfather beat Goldust for the belt on Monday Night RAW April 12, 1999 with his version of the Death Valley Driver. This match was originally scheduled to be Big Bossman vs Goldust, but Godfather gave Bossman five 'ho's' to BBM in exchange for the title shot.

  After the match, Godfather celebrated in-ring with his ho's and showed great joy in capturing the WWF's second-most prestigious singles' title.

  It's been a long fight for Godfather, who debuted in the WWF in 1992 as the mysterious voodoo daddy Papa Shango, after working in the CWF and USWA. He stuck around for about a year, feuding with Ultimate Warrior and The Undertaker before being let go.

  Wright was back a few years later as Kama, and tried to get by with his legit tough-guy skills. Eventually he joined the Nation of Domination, and was a valuable member of that elite gang but never won a title.

  In 1998, the WWF turned his character into The Godfather, a man who kept telling the world that "pimping ain't easy." While it is easy to criticize the character and its treatment of women, in the ring, the 6'6", 320-pound Godfather is still a tough competitor.

  -- By GREG OLIVER, SLAM! Wrestling