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My 'Mania memories
By BRET HART - Calgary Sun
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I've just learned of a comprehensive poll conducted by The Wrestling Observer, the most respected pro wrestling news digest, in which my Wrestlemania XIII match with Stone Cold Steve Austin was voted by both wrestling fans and wrestlers as the best match in the history of Wrestlemania. It was one of my all time favourites, too.

And it was also my last Wrestlemania.

With Wrestlemania XX only a week away, I thought I'd take a stroll down memory lane until the big show.

I'd just gotten to the WWF when they were putting together the first Wrestlemania but my first pay-per-view was Wrestlemania II, in Chicago, at the Rosemont Horizon.

I was in a 20-man over-the-top battle royal with such notable names as William (Refrigerator) Perry, who I remember bowling over me and my tag partner, Jim (The Anvil) Neidhart like a couple of bowling pins.

It did, in fact, come down to a showdown between me and Andre the Giant and the last thing I could remember was Andre tossing me over the top rope, like a bag of flour, to the ring floor into Anvil's waiting arms.

The following year, Wrestlemania III at the Pontiac Silverdome, boasted the largest indoor crowd in history, 93,173. In a triple-tag match, The Hart Foundation and Danny Davis took on two of my brothers-in-law, the British Bulldogs with Tito Santana.

I remember the Silverdome was so huge we were driven out to the ring in a little motorized cart and I was absolutely blown away by the magnitude of the crowd.

Unfortunately, that was the only part I clearly remember because, before my match started, The Bulldogs jumped the three of us and, just as I rolled to the floor, I looked up to see Davey Boy Smith press slamming Danny Davis over the top rope on top of me.

Danny came down like a skittish cat and nearly poked my eye out. The rest of the match was nothing but a teary blur.

At Wrestlemania IV, at Trump Plaza in Atlantic City, the 20-man battle royal came down to two guys, me and Bad News Brown, better known up here as Bad News Allen Coage. Old Bad News double-crossed me and won the battle royal, which ultimately turned me from a ruthless villain in pink into a rugged babyface.

Wrestlemania V was also in Atlantic City and The Hart Foundation manhandled Greg (The Hammer) Valentine and The Honky Tonk Man.

At Wrestlemania VI, more than 67,000 fans packed Toronto's SkyDome. The Hart Foundation made wrestling history with the fastest pay-per-view pinfall of all time when we defeated The Bolsheviks in only 17 seconds.

Wrestlemania VII, at the Los Angeles Sports Arena, turned out to be my final run as two-time WWF tag champ when The Nasty Boys managed to take the Anvil out with a motorcycle helmet to win the belts. This led to the eventual breakup of the original Hart Foundation and launched me into a singles career.

Wrestlemania VIII, at the Hoosier Dome in Indianapolis, would be a defining moment of my career. In the co-main event, Rowdy Roddy Piper kicked me with the toe of his boot just above my eye, opening me up, but I rallied back to pull off an amazing upset victory over the never- before-pinned Piper to claim the Intercontinental Title for the second time.

By the time I got to Wrestlemania IX, at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas, I was WWF world heavyweight champion, having climbed to the main event against 600-lb. Yokozuna.

What happened that day didn't make any sense then -- and it still doesn't now.

After having salt thrown into my eyes by Yoko's manager, Mr. Fuji, Hulk Hogan suddenly appeared at ringside and ended up with the title.

It was arguably the phoniest Wrestlemania finish contrived.

But little did I know my all-time best Wrestlemania moments were yet to come.

Next week, I'll shed some light on my classic world championship bouts with my brother Owen, Bob Backlund, Shawn Michaels and, of course, Stone Cold Steve Austin.

See ya next week.