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SLAM! Speaks: Thanks for the memories, Trish
By SLAM! Wrestling Staff


Trish gets mobile at a WWE presser. - photo by Jon Waldman

It's rare that a wrestler truly gets a chance to go out on top and say farewell to their fans in the manner that Trish Stratus was able to earlier this month.

In that same regard, it is hard for us as fans to say farewell to those who we are accustomed to watching week in and week out, especially when a retirement is about as permanant as a Dusty Finish.

However, this time, Stratus retired for good. She's made it clear that her bow at Unforgiven was, indeed, her final one.

So now, it is time for us to reciprocate. In honour of Trish's retirement from the world of professional wrestling (and her marriage to Ron on Saturday in Toronto), SLAM! Wrestling's staff have taken time to gather their thoughts on their favourite Trish Stratus moments. Here's what we had to say about the one and only, Trish Stratus.

Jason Clevett
In-ring, Trish has given a lot of great memories, and for me I will always think of her as one of the best female athletes ever in wrestling. While seeing her wearing the red and white of the maple leaf during her Wrestlemania X-8 match at SkyDome was a highlight, it is the next year that stands out.

I was in attendance at Wrestlemania in Seattle. On a show that was filled with great matches, she won the Women's Championship in a bout that was just as good as any of the men's and had the crowd on its feet. The next day I ended up near the hotel where the wrestlers were staying and watched as they came out to head to the Key Arena for RAW. Many of the wrestlers just went to their cars and left, while others stopped to take pictures and sign autographs. Trish was one of the performers who stopped. This, of course, was before I started working for SLAM! and I would still get star struck easily. I stumbled out something about being from Canada for the show, and her face lit up and she took a picture with me. It was obvious the pride she took in being from this country as well as the knowledge that Canadian fans travelled to see her and support the company. I look like a goof in the picture, but it's Trish Stratus -- you would too. I'd heard she was a class act through and through, and that day she proved it.

Brian Elliott
My favourite Trish Stratus moment may, ironically, be her last ever in a WWE ring. At Unforgiven, she and WWE Women's champion Lita engaged in what was one of the best Women's matches ever held on Pay Per View. Their bout was proof that women do have a place in professional wrestling, not by having "Bra & Panties" matches in the sports entertainment world, but by contesting serious, competitive bouts.

Trish Stratus initially caught the attention of World Wrestling Entertainment because of her stunning good looks. But her dedication to learning the art of professional wrestling will be what true fans remember her for.

In 2002, in an interview with Tim Baines, Trish noted that "I want to leave my mark in wrestling." Not only has she done that, but she's also set the standard for the WWE's other female competitors.


Cartoon by Annette Balesteri, our regular SLAM! Wrestling Editorial Cartoonist
(c) Annette Balesteri. No reproduction in any manner without permission.

Marty Goldstein
My favorite is actually a radio interview she did on the Friday before Unforgiven with Winnipeg Citi-FM's Cosmo on the drive-home show (which bumped my usual segment but I didn't mind).

Trish sounded relaxed and relieved and showed great humour about her career and her future, and even promised to visit the city without having to rush to and from a card for once. She showed herself to be a class act who hasn't let success blow her ego out of proportion.

Amy Lawson

By the time I became a wrestling fan, Trish was already at the top of her game. But from a woman's perspective -- she's something to be proud of. As one of the handful of female "wrestlers" that actually wrestle, she'll definitely be missed. Though I've never met her or spoken with her, it's obvious that she's classy and put together. While I don't have a favorite memory of her, I'm content to watch her beat just about any wrestler out there. She's definitely one of a kind.

Greg Oliver
I've told this story lots of times, and you'll understand why. I was in Anaheim at the Doubletree Hotel for WrestleMania 2000. It was the same hotel the WWF wrestlers were at. I was checking in, and Trish came in line behind me. I turned around and said, "Hey, Trish. I'm Greg Oliver. Nice to finally meet you." Her reaction was genuine. "Oh my God! You're Greg Oliver! I read your stories all the time!" So after 'Mania, we chatted again, and I wrote up More to Trish than T&A.

Jon Waldman
While I was living in Toronto, working for a collectibles publication, I had the opportunity to interview Trish for a profile I was writing on her. I had heard fellow journalists talk about how great Trish was when it came to dealing with the press, but I found out first hand what a true professional she is.

Stratus took the time not only to to chat with me about life in and out of the ring, but was completely honest and open about her work in the biz. To put it one way, I've interviewed hockey players who kayfabe more than Trish did. Trish was also more than happy to pose for a couple shots with a life-sized WWE cell phone (yes, it was as cheesy as it sounds) and had a smile on her face the whole time.

While my time with that particular publication is long gone, I still look back at that story as one of the best I have ever written and I owe its success to Trish, who was one of the more sincere athletes I have ever interviewed (Editor's note: if Trish is reading this, please feel free to e-mail me and I'll send you a copy of the story).

Oh yeah...and I guess being on her bio DVD would be a highlight as well :)

Now it's your turn. Share your Trish Stratus memories with SLAM! Wrestling by e-mailing Jon with your thoughts. Reader responses will be posted next week.

RELATED LINKS

  • More on Trish Stratus


    Visit the SLAM! Wrestling store!


  • Get Stratusfaction while you still can: Order Trish Stratus: 100% Stratusfaction DVD