Broadcasters double audio filters

A soccer fan blows the vuvuzela at Loftus Versfeld stadium in Pretoria. (REUTERS/Dylan Martinez)

A soccer fan blows the vuvuzela at Loftus Versfeld stadium in Pretoria. (REUTERS/Dylan Martinez)

MIKE ZEISBERGER, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 10:25 PM ET

JOHANNESBURG - If television viewers of Tuesday's World Cup match between Brazil and North Korea heard less vuvuzelas and more teeth chattering from the players during the broadcast from chilly Ellis Park Stadium, there is a good reason for that.

According to Host Broadcast Service, which provides the feed for World Cup matches, the audio filters have been doubled in order to help muzzle the constant wail of the plastic horns that have left viewers whining since the tournament kicked off Friday.

The BBC, for one, said it had received 545 complaints from viewers as of Tuesday.

"We have already taken steps to minimize the noise and are continuing to monitor the situation. If the vuvuzela continues to impact on audience enjoyment, we will look at what other options we can take to reduce the volume further," the BBC said in a statement.

While North Korea was playing its first World Cup game in 44 years, there reportedly were no journalists from that country at a frigid Ellis Park Stadium to cover the game.

Despite allowing a late goal in the dying minutes, Brazil held on for a 2-1 victory in frosty conditions that saw the wind chill dip temperatures to minus-four C.


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