FIFA won't ban stadium noise-makers

A fan blows a vuvuzela before the start of the match between Paraguay and Italy at Green Point...

A fan blows a vuvuzela before the start of the match between Paraguay and Italy at Green Point stadium in Cape Town. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

MIKE ZEISBERGER, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 3:50 PM ET

JOHANNESBURG - As we approach the giant bronzed pot known as Soccer City, our cab driver, a pleasantly upbeat chap named Wilfred, has a request for his passengers in the back seat.

“Hand me my vuvuzela please,” he asks, pointing at a case nestled on the window behind his two Canadian passengers.

That’s right. He keeps his plastic horn wrapped up in a case like it was a $5,000 guitar. Jimmy Page edition, of course.

That’s how much it means to him. To his friends. To the majority of South Africans.

“But Wilfred,” we ask, “what happens if they ban vuvuzelas from the stadiums?”

He gets a confused look on his face.

“Why would they do that?” he said. “Why?”

Why indeed.

It’s the same question Sepp Blatter, the head honcho of FIFA, has been asking himself, too.

Much like yours truly, Blatter has been getting overwhelmed with emails about vuvuzela-gate. Nice to know other people are getting ripped about their pro-vuvuzela stance too.

No matter. Blatter is holding firm. He won’t be swayed. There will be no bans. The vuvuzelas stay.

“To answer all your messages (regarding) the vuvuzelas. I have always said that Africa has a different rhythm, a different sound,” Blatter said through his twitter feed SeppBlatter.

“I don't see banning the music traditions of fans in their own country. Would you want to see a ban on the fan traditions in your country?”

Upon seeing Blatter’s comments, English defender Jamie Carragher immediately responded.

“I’ve just replied to Blatter, saying: ‘Too right, what would you rather hear, the coarse swearing from the fans at an everyday Premier League match in England?’”

As a member of Liverpool, Carragher would know.

“Anybody who’s been to Anfield knows I make more noise than any African football horn!” he said.

If fans start using vuvuzelas to beat each other over the head or begin chucking them at players on the pitch, Blatter would consider changing his mind. Until then, get accustomed to hearing the sounds of swarming wasps - the noise made by the controversial instruments - on your TV screen while watching World Cup 2010.

So says the Big Boss.

That won’t go over well with various players and managers alike. From Brazilian manager Dunga to Portuguese superstar Cristiano Ronaldo, there have been complaints aplenty about the vuvuzela.

But Carragher, like Blatter isn’t buying them.

“Anybody who’s been to Anfield knows I make more noise than any African football horn!” he said.

Loudmouth.

mike.zeisberger@sunmedia.ca


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