Olympic bronze medallist Hudec buried loonie at finish line

Canada's Jan Hudec waves a Canadian flag at the flower ceremony at the Rosa Khutor Alpine Center in...

Canada's Jan Hudec waves a Canadian flag at the flower ceremony at the Rosa Khutor Alpine Center in Sochi, Russia, Feb. 16, 2014. (DIDIER DEBUSSCHERE/QMI Agency)

Steve Simmons, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 6:23 PM ET

KRASNAYA POLYANA, RUSSIA - In fairness to Jan Hudec, who isn’t at all superstitious, he didn’t really remember the story of the Lucky Loonie and the Canadian hockey team at the Salt Lake City Olympics.

He knew the tradition. He just didn’t know where it came from.

Or didn’t remember.

And when his agent, Max Gartner, the former Canadian ski coach, sent him a loonie, through his wife Kerrin Lee-Gartner, and told him to bury it, he did what he was told.

“I was hoping I didn’t get dragged off by security guards (for doing it),” said the bronze-medal winner in Sunday’s Super-G.

Hudec went to the finish line at the Super-G course at Rosa Khutor, tried not to be noticed and buried his lucky loonie beneath the snow in a place where it would not interfere with any skiers.

After the race — and after a ski official dug up the loonie (and had trouble finding it), Hudec held it up and posed for photos. And later in the day, after winning his bronze medal, took many photos holding up the loonie and said: “I hope I don’t lose it.”

After the now famous Team Canada hockey Lucky Loonie story at the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City, the Canadian skiers began burying coins in the snow at races at Lake Louise.

“I didn’t know who started doing it,” said Hudec. “But I’m kind of glad I did. This coin is probably worth more than a dollar now.”

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