IIHF vows to change rule on nets knocked off mooring

Team USA's goalie Jonathan Quick sits on the ice with teammate Brooks Orpik as goalscorer Russia's...

Team USA's goalie Jonathan Quick sits on the ice with teammate Brooks Orpik as goalscorer Russia's Pavel Datsyuk is seen on the scoreboard during the second period of their men's preliminary round ice hockey game at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games February 15, 2014. (REUTERS)

QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 11:07 AM ET

You'll never see another game quite like the epic Russia-U.S. showdown last week at the Sochi Games.

The czar of international hockey is determined to make sure of that.

A would-be winning goal by Russia was disallowed late in the third period of the game, setting up an unforgettable shootout won when American T.J. Oshie scored for the fourth time on six attempts.

The Russian goal, a slap shot to the top corner from Fedor Tyutin, was disallowed because seconds before it went it, U.S. goalie Jonathan Quick, sliding across the crease, had knocked the net off its peg by mere centimetres.

That's the rule in international hockey - even if just slightly off the mooring, play must stop dead.

But that rule must now be changed, IIHF president Rene Fasel vowed Wednesday.

"We will change that rule," he told Russian reporter Igor Rabiner, as translated by Yahoo! Sports. "To disallow a goal because of two centimetres? That's nonsense."

It will be changed to "the way it is done in the NHL," where even if the net is raised or moved but part of the flexible pegs remain inside the posts, play is not whistled dead.

The referee who made the call, correct as per the rules, was Brad Meier. He's an American and has been vilified by Russians on social media and targeted with a relatively passive protest at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.


Photos