Canadian Grand Prix dealing with mould, fungi

For the last three years, employees have been complaining about mold issues in the paddocks at the...

For the last three years, employees have been complaining about mold issues in the paddocks at the Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal. (Benoit Pelosse/QMI Agency/Files)

JEAN-LOUIS FORTIN, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 6:53 PM ET

MONTREAL - The Canadian Grand Prix is preparing to welcome the world's best drivers in paddocks that are currently plagued by mould and fungi.

The smell inside these installations was overwhelmingly putrid and some mushrooms, which were growing out of the floor, measured as high as 20 cm, QMI Agency learned after it toured the trailers.

The humid carpets lining the inside of the trailers were stained with a white mousse.

QMI learned that for the last three years, employees have been complaining about mould issues in the paddocks, which during Grand Prix weekend are installed behind the pits and serve as a resting area for the world-famous drivers.

"Last year we changed the carpets and painted (the trailers)," one source told QMI. "But now it's worse than ever."

Race promoters added the trailers a few years ago as part of a $5.5 million renovation project to increase space on the race track grounds.

Expert Pierre Noel told QMI that by the time mould has gotten so bad mushrooms can be seen, "It's already too late; most often, the house has to be destroyed."

Noel said that a mushroom-infected home can sometimes be saved by increasing the temperature and drying out the mould.

Francois Dumontier, president and CEO of Octane Racing Group, the Canadian Grand Prix promoter, told QMI via email that his company doesn't own the trailers but rents them from the park on which the race is held.

F1 chief executive Bernie Ecclestone has complained in the past about Montreal's race infrastructure.


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