A brawl to recall

ROBERT TYCHKOWSKI, SUN MEDIA

, Last Updated: 2:53 AM ET

VANCOUVER -- They were still talking about the battle royal between Steve MacIntyre and Brian McGrattan a day after the Edmonton and Calgary heavyweights pounded each other for 68 seconds Saturday night.

Lubomir Visnovsky had a ringside seat as the two bombers went at it in front of the Oilers bench and he had eyes like saucers.

"Very long fight," he said. "I feel for Mac, it's not easy. He took some punches and he came back very strong."

MacIntyre took about three of McGrattan's best shots flush on the chin and kept coming. By the end of the bout he had reversed the flow and was landing power shots of his own.

"I think I was just getting a little madder," he said, adding he wished he would have started like he finished. "I was talking to my dad. My dad told me I have to figure out a way to win the start of the fight."

That he stayed on his feet is a testament to his chin. Then again, this is the same guy who, after getting his orbital bone broken against Eric Godard, got up off one knee, finished the fight, came back later in the period to lay out a Pittsburgh player with an open-ice hit and challenged Godard to a rematch.

"I've always known I could take them (punches)," he said, adding he was never all that worried. "It was more like 'Settle down here, this fight is going to end when you want it to finish.' He hit me a couple of good ones and I'm like, I'm not going to let him off the hook after getting me like that.

"The linesman asked 'Are you done?' Then (McGrattan) asked 'Are we done?' I was like, no freaking way I'm done."

Later in the game, McGrattan wanted to go with Zack Stortini for running roughshod on Jarome Iginla, but MacIntyre stepped in and said if the Flames enforcer still had some energy left they could have Round 2.

McGrattan politely declined.

- JF Jacques escaped serious injury when Dion Phaneuf's skate cut across his arm in the first period Saturday. He needed six stitches to close the gash but said it could have been a lot worse.

"It was pretty deep, but not deep enough to cut anything (like tendons or ligaments)," he said. "I'm used to it now. I had one in the face and now this. (Stuff) happens."

ROBERT.TYCHKOWSKI@SUNMEDIA.CA


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