SUN Hockey Pool

Painful lesson

ROBERT TYCHKOWSKI, SUN MEDIA

, Last Updated: 8:44 AM ET

NEW YORK -- If Steve MacIntyre isn't scary enough at six-foot-six and 265 pounds, consider this: After breaking his orbital bone in a fight with Eric Godard, he misses less than 10 minutes, comes back, lays out a Penguin with an crushing open ice hit and challenges Godard to a rematch.

A little tough, are we?

"That's just the way that I am, I don't like to lose, especially scrapping," chuckled the Oilers heavyweight, who'll be evaluated by doctors Wednesday in Edmonton to determine whether he needs surgery. "I was wanting to get at 'er again (they didn't). I don't know if that would have been a good thing to do, but I don't take too kindly to losing, especially like that.

"They're going to have to keep on breaking my face because I'm going to be coming. That's the way I've been taught. You get bucked off, you get right back up there.

"That's what my dad said, 'You might lose that fight, but you keep going or you're going to have me to deal with.' "

MacIntyre didn't even know he'd been injured till "I went to blow my nose the whole side of my face swelled up."

Painful, but maybe not too surprising. Godard has one of the heaviest punches in the league, ask Derek Boogaard, who missed time with a concussion after losing to him last season.

"I knew going into the fight that I was fighting one of the tougher guys in the league," said MacIntyre. "In my job, you live by the sword and you die by the sword.

"There's going to be those nights where you take a couple to give a couple and unfortunately I took a couple too many, that's the way it goes.

"It's not going to keep me down. We'll wait till it heals and then it's back in the saddle again."

The loss probably hurts worse than the injury, but that's the life of an NHL heavy-weight.

"There's some tough guys in this league and I'm going to have to take my lumps," said MacIntyre, who was playing just his 10th NHL game. "It's unfortunate but it happens. It's not going to faze me when it comes to my willingness to be there for the guys.

"I've been in a lot of scraps in my lifetime and every scrap you're in you learn something. You're going against the cream of the crop guys; you have to learn from your mistakes. That's what I'm going to do."

He and Godard have fought about a half dozen times before, in junior and the minors, winning about three each.

"He's been around the NHL for a while, fought a lot of tough guys and he's gotten a heck of a lot tougher," said MacIntyre. "I can't wait for the next one, maybe a little retribution, prove that you might knock me down but you won't get rid of me."

SMID FEELING BETTER: LADISLAV SMID, KNOCKED FROM THE LINEUP WITH A CONCUSSION AFTER RAFFI TORRES ELBOWED HIM IN COLUMBUS, IS COMING OUT OF THE FOG A LITTLE.

"I rode the bike and I felt a little headache, but I feel way better than the last few days," said Smid, who has some colour back in his face. "I'm going to ride the bike a little bit more and we'll see, hopefully I'm going to get a chance to go on the ice."

The injury derails the progress he was making after starting the season in the press box.

"I'd been playing good the last few games. I felt strong in the battles and really good with the puck, too. Kind of my luck, I guess."

Smid never saw the elbow when it happened, obviously, but has watched tape of it, and isn't happy.

"I didn't really think about it the first day, but yesterday I saw the video and I'm a little bit mad. I think it was kind of a cheap shot."


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