U.S. Open not rough enough

Martin Kaymer hits from the rough during the final round of the U.S. Open on Sunday. (MIKE...

Martin Kaymer hits from the rough during the final round of the U.S. Open on Sunday. (MIKE SEGAR/REUTERS)

JON MCCARTHY, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 10:59 PM ET

PINEHURST, N.C. - The definitive moment of the U.S. Open was a shot that should never have happened.

Martin Kaymer’s towering 200-yard 7-iron that set up an eagle from left of the fairway at Pinehurst No. 2’s fifth hole on Saturday got his game back on track. And it wouldn’t have happened during any of the past 50 U.S. Opens.

The restoration of Pinehurst No. 2 was dramatic. All of the rough was removed and replaced with the much talked about sandy, natural areas. The fairways were widened and sprinklers were removed. All week we heard about the savings in water consumption and maintenance costs, and that brown is beautiful and is the future of the game. We heard that the course now looked like it did in 1935 when Donald Ross finished his work. We heard that the tradition of Pinehurst had been restored.

What about the tradition of the U.S. Open?

The signature of America’s national open is deep rough and blazing fast greens.


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