U.S. Open 'Doomsday' scenario was wishful thinking

Spectators walk past a flooded area along a fairway after a rainstorm interrupted play during a...

Spectators walk past a flooded area along a fairway after a rainstorm interrupted play during a practice round for the U.S. Open at the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Penn., June 10, 2013. (REUTERS/Adam Hunger)

JON MCCARTHY, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 10:58 PM ET

The “Doomsday of all Doomsday scenarios” was beginning to seem like a real possibility Monday.

At least, it was to me.

I’ll admit I was more than intrigued when USGA executive director Mike Davis used that term in Golf Digest to describe his contingency plan if severe flooding at Merion Golf Club wiped out holes 11 and 12 on the championship East Course during the U.S. Open.

The contingency plan is to use two holes from the neighbouring West Course that have been brought up to U.S. Open standards.

Both Davis and Merion’s director of golf operations, Matt Shaffer, went out of their way leading up to the Open to explain how remote this possibility was. But if Davis wanted to play it down, he shouldn’t have given it such a cool name.

Doomsday of all Doomsday scenarios? That gets your attention.


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