Seeing double on ninth green

CHRIS STEVENSON -- Sun Media

, Last Updated: 8:53 AM ET

The ninth green at Oakmont is huge, with the back half of it doubling as the practice green. There is a blue line dividing the ninth green and the practice area.

As some players putt out on the ninth, others will be in the background getting ready to head out for their rounds.

So what happens if a guy playing the ninth holes out into one of the practice holes?

The practice cups are designated as "ground under repair," so the golfer can just place the ball and play it without penalty.

The practising players cannot play a ball on the wrong side of the blue line. If they do, they will be disqualified.

DOUBLE DIP ON NO. 8

The eighth hole is the longest par-three in U.S. Open history at 288 yards.

USGA championship committee chairman Jim Hyler said he overheard a player say: "This is the only hole he had ever seen that you could have a long drive and closest to the hole competition on the same hole."

GET IT STRAIGHT

Defending champion Geoff Ogilvy dismissed rumours he shot an 85 with six lost balls during a practice round here.

"An exaggeration," he said. "I think I shot 83 and lost two."

WHAT WAS THAT?

Spain's Sergio Garcia is one of the most quotable guys on the tour, if you can understand him. He had this to say when asked if holes 7-10 are the meat of the course.

"How about 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15. It's one part of the meat, but it's not the whole meat. It's not the whole, you know, chicken wing or whatever you want to call it."

RED-FLAGGED

The USGA isn't using its traditional yellow nylon flags for the U.S. Open and is adopting the host club's red cloth flags.


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