Golf's biggest debate rages on post-Masters, and it's not about Tiger Woods

Adam Scott celebrates sinking a birdie putt on the 18th green during final round of the Masters at...

Adam Scott celebrates sinking a birdie putt on the 18th green during final round of the Masters at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga., April 14, 2013. (MIKE SEGAR/Reuters)

TIM McKAY, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 8:02 PM ET

One of golf’s biggest debates is still very much alive in the wake of Sunday’s final round at the Masters.

No, it’s not whether Tiger Woods will ever win another major. It’s whether or not the anchored putter should go the way of the dodo.

It doesn’t matter what side of the debate you fall on, the truth is the anchored putter is gaining momentum.

Surely much to the horror of the United States Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient folks, the putting method has won four of the past six majors.

Just after winning the Masters by broomsticking a putt into the hole in a playoff against Argentina’s Angel Cabrera on Sunday, Australian Adam Scott sat on the podium in his newly-fitted green jacket and wondered what another notch in the majors-win column would do for the pro-anchoring debate.

“Well, I don’t know what it’s going to do,” he said. “We are all waiting to hear what’s going to happen. I don’t know that this is going to impact any decisions at all. You know my feeling on it all; that it was inevitable that big tournaments would be won with this equipment, because you know, these are the best players in the world and they practice thousands of hours. They are going to get good with whatever they are using. It’s inevitable.”

Yes, it is inevitable.

With each victory, the USGA and R&A’s case for a ban is becoming less and less sensible.


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