Depression tougher battle than golf for young pro

Andrew Jensen. (KATHRYN BURNHAM/CORNWALL STANDARD-FREEHOLDER/QMI AGENCY)

Andrew Jensen. (KATHRYN BURNHAM/CORNWALL STANDARD-FREEHOLDER/QMI AGENCY)

DON BRENNAN, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 8:29 PM ET

OTTAWA - Less than a week ago, the darkest of thoughts once again filled Andrew Jensen’s head.

He sat in his car and considered killing himself.

Fast approaching was the biggest tournament of his life. He had grown up at Hylands Golf Course, putted on the 16th green fantasizing that a championship was on the line. And now, as a 30-year-old, he was about to get a chance to play in a PGA Tour Canada event on his home track.

This was an opportunity to make a dream come true, but instead of being pumped, the nightmare had returned.

Jensen, who shot a 2-over 73 in Thursday’s opening round of the Forces & Families Tournament, is not afraid to speak about a mental illness that has led him to three suicide attempts. He “wrestles” with depression. With the realization of his condition, therapy and medicine, he says it’s now “manageable.”

Knowing that he’s not safe from it has helped him deal.

“There’s danger in my thoughts,” said Jensen. “I think about it. I think about suicide a lot. But I’ve embraced that. I know that it’s just how it manifests in me. I don’t cut myself. I don’t hurt myself. I think about it. And when things get down, yeah I think about how.

“I thought about it on Friday. I walked off the course at Seaforth, I’d just been exhausted, and I was falling into a place. I was sitting on the 401, I had all my medication with me because I’ve been living in my car for a month ... and yeah I think about it.”


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