Burris says his field vision improving

IAN BUSBY -- Calgary Sun

, Last Updated: 12:09 PM ET

TORONTO -- Wearing stylish eyeglasses with that thousand-watt smile, Henry Burris walked into the team's hotel yesterday and proclaimed he's seen the light.

Suddenly, the Calgary Stampeders quarterback is leading an offence that's setting the tone for opposition instead of the other way around.

"I can see things now before they're happening," said Burris, when he arrived with the Stamps from Kingston, Ont., where they spent three days practising at Queen's University.

"That was the case in Montreal. I could see things happening and the game began to slow down. That's what I've been working so hard to get to. I wanted to allow the game to slow down and evolve around our scheme and what we're trying to do each and every play."

Burris had only three days to prepare for the Toronto Argonauts tomorrow at Rogers Centre (5:30 p.m.) but with the way the offence clicked against the Alouettes, the quarterback can't wait to get back on the field.

Three games into Burris' first season back in Calgary, the offence was being criticized for misfiring more than it connected.

Five games later, no one is questioning the unit's proficiency. In the process, Burris has moved up to third on the CFL passing leader's list.

The reason for the entire unit's turn-around is simple to running back Joffrey Reynolds.

"In the eighth game going into the ninth game, everybody has the confidence as to what's expected of them in what play is called," said the second leading rusher in the league. "It's slowly but surely coming along."

The Stamps are throwing opponents off guard by changing formations on a play-to-play basis. Against the Als, the Stamps would go from two backs with four receivers, to one back with five wideouts to three backs with three pass catchers.

Sometimes both Scott Deibert and offensive lineman Tyler Lynem would come in as blocking fullbacks, then six receivers would be on the field.

Sometimes this would happen on one drive and each time a new player comes on the field, he becomes the focus of the defence and opens someone else up.

Argos head coach Michael (Pinball) Clemons had only one practice to get ready for Calgary's system after playing Saturday night in Edmonton and he realizes the challenge this week.

"The intangible presented is the mobility of Burris," Clemons said.

"He's moving around so well and isn't hesitating to use his legs. So many times guys get in that mode where they want to prove they can throw the ball.

"Right now, he just has the mindset to do whatever it takes to win. That makes him extra dangerous."

Burris credits offensive co-ordinator Steve Buratto and how he has made each player think team first. Receivers are jumping up to block to get a few extra yards.

"Steve understands the games ins and outs and the things that are going to happen," Burris said. "He can't tell us everything that's going to happen but he takes us far enough. He's worked with guys so much that he's put in position to make plays.

"Everybody is not going to get the ball on every play because there is only one ball."

Burris says his field vision improving

By Ian Busby, Calgary Sun

TORONTO -- Wearing stylish eyeglasses with that thousand-watt smile, Henry Burris walked into the team's hotel yesterday and proclaimed he's seen the light.

Suddenly, the Calgary Stampeders quarterback is leading an offence that's setting the tone for opposition instead of the other way around.

"I can see things now before they're happening," said Burris, when he arrived with the Stamps from Kingston, Ont., where they spent three days practising at Queen's University.

"That was the case in Montreal. I could see things happening and the game began to slow down. That's what I've been working so hard to get to. I wanted to allow the game to slow down and evolve around our scheme and what we're trying to do each and every play."

Burris had only three days to prepare for the Toronto Argonauts tomorrow at Rogers Centre (5:30 p.m.) but with the way the offence clicked against the Alouettes, the quarterback can't wait to get back on the field.

Three games into Burris' first season back in Calgary, the offence was being criticized for misfiring more than it connected.

Five games later, no one is questioning the unit's proficiency. In the process, Burris has moved up to third on the CFL passing leader's list.

The reason for the entire unit's turn-around is simple to running back Joffrey Reynolds.

"In the eighth game going into the ninth game, everybody has the confidence as to what's expected of them in what play is called," said the second leading rusher in the league. "It's slowly but surely coming along."

The Stamps are throwing opponents off guard by changing formations on a play-to-play basis. Against the Als, the Stamps would go from two backs with four receivers, to one back with five wideouts to three backs with three pass catchers.

Sometimes both Scott Deibert and offensive lineman Tyler Lynem would come in as blocking fullbacks, then six receivers would be on the field.

Sometimes this would happen on one drive and each time a new player comes on the field, he becomes the focus of the defence and opens someone else up.

Argos head coach Michael (Pinball) Clemons had only one practice to get ready for Calgary's system after playing Saturday night in Edmonton and he realizes the challenge this week.

"The intangible presented is the mobility of Burris," Clemons said.

"He's moving around so well and isn't hesitating to use his legs. So many times guys get in that mode where they want to prove they can throw the ball.

"Right now, he just has the mindset to do whatever it takes to win. That makes him extra dangerous."

Burris credits offensive co-ordinator Steve Buratto and how he has made each player think team first. Receivers are jumping up to block to get a few extra yards.

"Steve understands the games ins and outs and the things that are going to happen," Burris said. "He can't tell us everything that's going to happen but he takes us far enough. He's worked with guys so much that he's put in position to make plays.

"Everybody is not going to get the ball on every play because there is only one ball."


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