Drastic differences in the way stones react in Brier competition stirring up controversy among curlers

They may look identical, may even have matching specs, but the rocks at the 2013 Edmonton Brier...

They may look identical, may even have matching specs, but the rocks at the 2013 Edmonton Brier show variable tendencies that make it difficult for competitors to throw consistently. (Ian Kucerak, Edmonton Sun)

TERRY JONES, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 1:13 AM ET

Will this go down in history as the ‘Rogue Rock Brier?’

Will Edmonton 2013 be remembered like the 1973 edition here, which is referred to, to this day, as the ‘Hot Rocks Brier’?

Or will this be like Hamilton 2007 and the ‘Exploding Rocks Brier’?

There are few things more sad than a curling controversy. Especially one which quite probably could cure itself by, oh, about Thursday like Canadian Curling Association officials expect.

But there’s no question after the first three days of competition that the curlers have it in their heads that there’s something wrong with the new set of rocks from the legendary Ailsa Craig, a now uninhabited island of 220 acres formed from the volcanic plug of an extinct volcano in the outer Firth of Clyde Scotland, where blue hone granite is quarried to make the world’s best curling rocks.

They’re rogues, they report.

The thing that makes it interesting is that they are the twin sister set to the rocks which will be us


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