MLB notes: Former Dodgers owner McCourt turned $1.3 billion profit

Boston real estate developer Frank McCourt announces that Major League Baseball had approved his...

Boston real estate developer Frank McCourt announces that Major League Baseball had approved his purchase of the Los Angeles Dodgers for $430 million, at a Dodger Stadium news conference in Los Angeles, California in this January 29, 2004 file photograph. The Los Angeles Dodgers and owner McCourt announced a deal on March 27, 2012 to sell the Dodgers team for $2 billion to Guggenheim Baseball Management LLC, a group that includes former basketball great Earvin "Magic" Johnson as one of its partners. REUTERS/Jim Ruymen/Files

QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 9:53 PM ET

Former Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt turned a profit of $1.278-billion when he sold the Dodgers to Guggenheim Baseball Management last year.

The Los Angeles Times reported the terms of McCourt’s agreement with the Guggenheim group on Tuesday after the amount of McCourt’s tax payments were disclosed in an L.A. court hearing, where his former wife asked a judge to have their original $131-million settlement thrown out.

Jamie McCourt now says her husband misled her as to the value of the Dodgers when their original divorce settlement was agreed upon, according to the Times.

The Dodgers were sold to Guggenhem last March for $2.15-billion, of which the financial group agreed to take on $412 million in team debts, according to documents filed in U.S. bankruptcy court.

LACKEY’S BACK

John Lackey will need an additional minor-league start before rejoining the Boston Red Sox, according to MLB.com.

The 34-year-old righty worked 3 2/3 scoreless innings on Monday night in a rehab stint with Boston’s triple-A affiliate in Portland, Maine, where he conceded three hits and two walks on 67 pitches.

Lackey was forced off a major-league mound on April 6 with a right biceps strain in his first MLB start since undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2011.

ROCKIES BRAVE WEATHER

A frigid afternoon game between the Colorado Rockies and Atlanta Braves shattered a long-standing record.

With parts of the Coors Field remaining closed during Tuesday’s day-night doubleheader, temperatures at first pitch hovered around -5C at the mile-high stadium.

The previous low for a major-league game played in Denver occurred on April 12, 1997, when the Rockies hosted the Montreal Expos in temperatures approaching -2C, one of the coldest outdoor MLB games on record.

In contrast, the Toronto Blue Jays participated in the hottest game on record when they travelled to face the Texas Rangers with thermometers hitting 43C on Aug. 26, 1988.

BRIEFLY

Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tommy Hanson has been placed on the bereavement list due to a death in his family. According to MLB.com, the Angels could promote reliever Jerome Williams to assume Hanson’s scheduled start against the Texas Rangers on Wednesday … Braves right fielder Jason Heyward will miss two weeks after undergoing an emergency appendectomy Monday night in Denver. But while the Braves lost Heyward, they gained first baseman Freddie Freeman, who returned from the 15-day DL with an oblique strain … Detroit Tigers closer Bruce Rondon has been recalled from triple-A Toledo after the Tigers placed veteran righty Octavio Dotel on the disabled list with an elbow strain … Dodgers righty Chad Billingsley will have Tommy John surgery on Wednesday, sidelining the 28-year-old for at least a year


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